Coaches Corner: The Roles Of Player And Coach

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As I mentioned before, I’m a Badger alum, so I watch their volleyball team with a more attentive eye than other programs.  Because I know the type of team Kelly Sheffield inherited, I am more than amazed at the turnaround he spearheaded.  So I asked him about some of the critical things he and his coaching staff did that helped to create a much more successful team.  Check out what he had to say.

The coach’s role

  • Consistency.  Sheffield says his team should never worry about what kind of mood he’s in.  Monday’s the same as Thursday, after a win is the same as after a loss.
  • Knowledge.  I think it goes without saying that we’ve got to know what we’re talking about and staying up to date on the latest training methods.
  • Energy and enthusiasm.  That looks like lots of player feedback, coaches engaged with athletes…not chatting with one another.



The player’s role

  • Connect with teammates.  Sheffield expects high energy and enthusiasm from his athletes.  If he’s bringing it, he expects to see it from players as well.
  • Put personal traits aside.  He says that it’s tough to be an introvert in a team sport.  I wrote about some techniques to work with the introverts on your team a while back, you should check it out.  Studies say that 75% of folks are extroverts, so it’s easy to see why those traits are valued in leaders.
  • Be an active participant in their own rescue.  If something’s going wrong—on or off the court—the player has a responsibility to seek help.  Whether it’s coming in for extra reps on their own or, if it’s a classroom issue, seeking out tutors.  Whatever it is, coaches aren’t psychic, players have to help us out.



Success is sometimes a moving target, but these tips should help us all to start down the right path.

Check out the Sheffield series:
Coaches Corner: Kelly Sheffield
Coaches Corner: Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable
Coaches Corner: What Does Enthusiasm Look Like?
Coaches Corner: Four Things To Think About When Considering A New Job


Join me in a series of interviews with successful coaches.  I believe what we learn from our coaching peers can be applied to our teams, our recruiting efforts, and how we behave as professionals.  These interviews will be less Q & A and much more philosophical in nature, keep coming back to see who I’m talking to and what they’ve got to say!