Tag Archives: Becky Schmidt

Coaches Corner: Evaluating Drills For Effective Practices

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I’m a big fan of evaluating my program after each season. Everything from hotels and restaurants we used to game schedule and practice plans. I certainly don’t think that evaluation must necessarily lead to changes, though it should lead to comfort that you’re doing things in the best possible way given the tools (budget, staff, athletes, knowledge) at your disposal. As the tools change, you and your program may have to change…hence the evaluation.

While practice planning may sound an awful lot like an X’s and O’s conversation, don’t you worry, I plan to stay on the philosophical plane. When I talked to Becky Schmidt, head volleyball coach at Hope College, she talked about a change of philosophy she’s made in regards to practice.

She said she used to think every second of practice was important and needed to be planned, now she says she’s much more willing to experiment and not be afraid to waste time. As Schmidt evaluated her only practices and drills, she noticed many of her drills were old favorites from her playing days. She then had to challenge herself to innovate, because surely better (more efficient, more relevant, more applicable) drills have been created in that time span. And if not, she should create them!

This is something all of us can and should do. Drills that were great for one team may fall flat with another. Just as we have to modify our coaching styles for our athletes, we have to modify our coaching methods for our teams.

Join me in a series of interviews with successful coaches.  I believe what we learn from our coaching peers can be applied to our teams, our recruiting efforts, and how we behave as professionals. These interviews will be less Q & A and much more philosophical in nature, keep coming back to see who I’m talking to and what they’ve got to say!

Coaches Corner: On Being A High Energy Coach

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Becky Schmidt is the head volleyball coach at Hope College. She’s also a professor at the college, with a Master’s in Sport Behavior and Performance. I found a quotation from one of her non-volleyball students that gave a glimpse into who she is: “Crazy woman. Sleeps like 3 hours a night and drinks lots of coffee. Bursting with energy and excitement about everything, especially volleyball.”

It turns out, while a lot of her energy is natural, Schmidt is also constantly aware of her energy output. She would say the main reason she is so engaged is because she had moody coaches in the past. Because she knows how annoying it is to be on the receiving end of that kind of treatment, she tries hard to remain the same. As a matter of fact, she says she’s even keyed in when she’s out recruiting. She’s engaged…all the time.

I was interested in how she did that, of course, but more interested in how she challenged her players and students to match her intensity level.

  1. Challenge team to give max effort. Schmidt talked a lot about how we, as coaches, can show our players how not to limit themselves. She says she asks her players to give her whatever they have in the moment. Feeling your absolute best isn’t the prerequisite for hard work…just the desire to put in the effort.
  2. Help them to stop being afraid of failure. This is one of those life skills that we tell our athletes they learn from playing our sport. This quality alone will put our athletes ahead of their competition once they’re in the work force.



What if they’re not doing those things?

  1. Call them out on it right away. I think I can do a better job of this one. I sometimes give my athletes too much leeway to pull themselves out of the mire. According to Schmidt, I need to intervene sooner.
  2. Give them the confidence to push themselves. As coaches, we can show them how much we believe in their potential by expecting more from them. If our athletes have inappropriately low expectations of themselves, it’s our job to raise them up…no matter how tough it is.
  3. Correction vs. criticism. This isn’t necessarily for the coaches, but for the players. Many times, any sort of correction is seen as criticism. For us to be able to do our jobs, our athletes have to be able receive correction in the spirit that it’s given.



Join me in a series of interviews with successful coaches.  I believe what we learn from our coaching peers can be applied to our teams, our recruiting efforts, and how we behave as professionals. These interviews will be less Q & A and much more philosophical in nature, keep coming back to see who I’m talking to and what they’ve got to say!

Coaches Corner: What Is Advanced Teamwork?

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Becky Schmidt is the head volleyball coach at Hope College and has had an amazingly successful run. Consistently in the top five of Division III, she’s figured out what it takes to put winning teams together. In talking to her about some strategic moves she made within her team, she used a term I’d not heard before: advanced teamwork. She talked about managing a larger than normal team and how she went about creating “a team” within that construct.

What is advanced teamwork?

  1. Hold one another accountable. This one is a doozy. The only, and I mean only, teams I’ve had that have been successful have been able to effectively navigate the world of peer management.
  2. No cliques. Another tough one, because teams have natural divisions within them…most notably, classes. Generally, your freshmen will hang out together, your sophomores, you get the idea. Part of this should be handled by the captains, they’ve got to build bridges within the team. The other part is on us, as coaches, to stay on top of our team’s chemistry.
  3. Respect one another. I think this could be underrated by our players. How many times have you had issues on your team because one player thinks another isn’t working hard? Or thinks a teammate didn’t do something they were supposed to do? Or isn’t performing up to their potential? All of those problems have respect as a root cause.
  4. Seek out greater relationships. I really like this one, it may be my favorite of all of Schmidt’s advanced teamwork tips. For players and coaches alike, we’ve got to step out of our comfort zones and really get to know one another. Not just the surface, “Susie is a senior nursing major”…you can learn that from the media guide. Let’s seek to really learn about one another.



Creating “a team” is the biggest challenge and most important duty of a head coach…and the bigger the team, the bigger the challenge. Hopefully, you learn some good tactics to help your team become closer to the coaches as well as one another.

Join me in a series of interviews with successful coaches.  I believe what we learn from our coaching peers can be applied to our teams, our recruiting efforts, and how we behave as professionals. These interviews will be less Q & A and much more philosophical in nature, keep coming back to see who I’m talking to and what they’ve got to say!

Coaches Corner: Becky Schmidt

Becky Schmidtsource

Next on the docket is Becky Schmidt, head volleyball coach at Division III Hope College. Schmidt has been tremendously successful while at the helm of the Flying Dutch.

She’s never had a losing season while coaching her alma mater and holds the school record for victories at 34-4.   She’s had nine 20-win seasons and a career winning percentage of .791. Beyond the numbers lie the dominance Hope College has enjoyed under Schmidt’s direction. They are a perennial national contender for not only the top twenty-five in the country, but to win it all.

Stay tuned for highlights from our conversation:

  • Evaluating and changing practices and drills.
  • Discussing advanced teamwork.
  • Monitoring her energy level.



See you next time!

Join me in a series of interviews with successful coaches.  I believe what we learn from our coaching peers can be applied to our teams, our recruiting efforts, and how we behave as professionals. These interviews will be less Q & A and much more philosophical in nature, keep coming back to see who I’m talking to and what they’ve got to say!